18.05.2022

Twitter developing a ‘Save for Later’ bookmarking feature

Twitter is developing a bookmarking feature that allows user to privately save tweets for later.

A product manager shared an early prototype of the feature which is referred to as ‘Save for Later’ and could save users from liking and retweeting to bookmark things.

The prototype on the mobile site features an overflow icon which pops up with an ‘Add to Bookmarks’ button alongside the ‘Share via DM’ option.

'Fresh out of HackWeek and coming soon ¿ a new way to save tweets to read later... The team would love your feedback as they dial in the design!', head of product Keith Coleman tweeted

‘Fresh out of HackWeek and coming soon – a new way to save tweets to read later… The team would love your feedback as they dial in the design!’, head of product Keith Coleman tweeted

#SAVEFORLATER

The project has been dubbed #SaveForLater and will make saving an article for later easier.

Product managers tweeted that there had been lots of demand for such a feature – especially in Japan.

Many users click on the ‘heart’ icon to save something for later but this suggests you feel postively about whatever you are saving.

This new feature, born out of Hack Wek, should provide an alternative that maintains a user’s privacy.

The feature is in the experiment phase and the company is still looking for feedback as they share designs.

This new feature, born out of Hack Week, should provide an alternative that maintains a user’s privacy and will make saving articles easier.

Product managers tweeted that there had been lots of demand for such a feature – especially in Japan.

Many users click on the ‘heart’ icon to save something for later but this suggests you feel positively about whatever you are saving.

‘Fresh out of HackWeek and coming soon – a new way to save tweets to read later. Been a top request! The team would love your feedback as they dial in the design!’, head of product Keith Coleman tweeted.

The feature is in the experiment phase and the company is still looking for feedback as they share designs.

They have not provided information about when the feature might roll out – saying that the design is still likely to change.

‘For Hack Week @Twitter we started developing #SaveForLater. Here’s the early prototype that we put together in a week, which is likely to change’, tweeted product manager Jesar Shah.

‘We want to build this WITH you all! So we need your help. We’ll be Tweeting to ask for feedback, and share our thinking as we compare designs, experiment, do research, and more’, tweeted Ms Shah.

Product managers tweeted that there had been lots of demand for such a feature - especially in Japan - but there are no details about when the feature might roll out

Product managers tweeted that there had been lots of demand for such a feature – especially in Japan – but there are no details about when the feature might roll out

'We¿ll be Tweeting to ask for feedback, and share our thinking as we compare designs, experiment, do research, and more', tweeted product manager Jesar Shah

‘We’ll be Tweeting to ask for feedback, and share our thinking as we compare designs, experiment, do research, and more’, tweeted product manager Jesar Shah

‘For Hack Week @Twitter we started developing #SaveForLater. Here’s the early prototype that we put together in a week, which is likely to change’, tweeted Ms Shah

‘We are working on #SaveForLater. As someone who reads a LOT on Twitter, I’m so excited for this’, tweeted Sriram Krishnan who works on product development at Twitter.

At the end of last month Twitter announced more changes to their social network, saying they were testing doubling the character limit of tweets with some accounts.

The social network said it hoped the move would stop people having to ‘cram’ their thoughts into 140 characters.

‘We are working on #SaveForLater. As someone who reads a LOT on Twitter, I’m so excited for this’, tweeted Sriram Krishnan who works on product development at Twitter

At the end of last month Twitter announced more changes to their social network, saying they were testing doubling the character limit of tweets with some accounts

At the end of last month Twitter announced more changes to their social network, saying they were testing doubling the character limit of tweets with some accounts

Twitter said: ‘We want every person around the world to easily express themselves on Twitter, so we’re doing something new: we’re going to try out a longer limit, 280 characters, in languages impacted by cramming (which is all except Japanese, Chinese, and Korean).

‘Trying to cram your thoughts into a Tweet – we’ve all been there, and it’s a pain,’ said Aliza Rosen of Twitter, announcing the tests.

News reports in January 2016 said that Twitter was running internal tests for longer tweets and considering a limit as high as 10,000 characters.

Though Twitter is ubiquitous in media because of frequent use by U.S. President Donald Trump and many celebrities, the company has struggled financially.

For the second quarter, it reported a loss of $116 million (£87 million) and zero growth in the number of users, at 328 million people.

A higher character limit was inspired by how people use Twitter when writing in Chinese, Japanese and Korean, the company said.

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